Deliver CDC’s Triple Punch to Fight Flu

(Excerpted from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)

It’s the bug of all super bugs. This year’s influenza (flu) activity is widespread across 49 contiguous states. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends three actions to fight the flu:

1. Take the time to get a flu vaccine.

  • The CDC recommends a yearly flu vaccine as the first and most important step in protecting against flu viruses.
  • While there are many different flu viruses, a flu vaccine protects against the viruses that research suggests will be most common.
  • Flu vaccination can reduce flu illnesses, doctors’ visits, and missed work and school due to flu, as well as prevent flu-related hospitalizations.
  • Everyone 6 months of age and older should get a flu vaccine every year before flu activity begins in their community. CDC recommends getting vaccinated by the end of October, if possible. However, there is still time to get a flu shot this year. Learn more about vaccine timing.
  • Vaccination of high-risk persons(https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/high_risk.htm) is especially important to decrease their risk of severe flu illness.

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Use These 3 Reasons to Convince Your Boss to Send You to Safety Works Expo

You’d love to get out of the office, meet other business owners, HR managers, safety professionals and learn something new. But the boss is a little nervous that it’s an excuse for you to head straight to the golf course or meet up with friends for lunch.

We get it. That’s why we’ve created a quick list of reasons to help you win your boss’ Continue reading

Law Curbs Over-prescription of Opioids for Work Comp Patients

Last week Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey signed SB1283, designed to curb the over-prescription of opioids and benzodiazepines (commonly called tranquilizers) by healthcare providers. The new law requires providers to get patient utilization reports from the state’s prescription monitoring program database before writing a new script for treatment. It also requires provider to make a quarterly check to make sure prescriptions are appropriate for the patient’s use.

Arizona joins 10 other states, including Massachusetts, New York and Tennessee in requiring medical providers to use databases before prescribing narcotics.

However, state law grants healthcare providers a one-year waiver from adhering to the new requirement if the provider says meeting the mandate cannot be done because of technological limitations beyond their control or exceptional circumstances.

Workers comp professionals had pushed for the new law as a way to reduce overuse and patient addiction. The law covers prescriptions for Schedule II, III and IV controlled substances.