OSHA OMG: Violations and shaming employers

DeniseBlommelBy Denise M. Blommel
Employment Law Attorney

First, penalties for OSHA violations go way up on August 1, 2016.

Second, OSHA admitted on its website that its motivation is to shame employers.

As the kids say, “OMG!”

OSHA penalties have not risen since 1990.

Here’s the new penalty schedule, which Arizona’s Division of Occupational Safety and Health (ADOSH) must adopt:

Willful                                                    No less than $8,908 or more than $124,709.

Repeat                                                   No more than $124,709

Serious and other than serious          No more than $12,471

Failure to correct                                  No more than $12,471 per day

Posting violation                                  No more than $12,471

Not every employer has to keep an OSHA 300 log.  (See the list here to ascertain whether your business is exempt.)  If you are exempt, breathe a little easier.  If not, take a deep breath.

If your business has to keep an OSHA 300 log, you only have a few months to get ready for the 21st century version of the pillory stocks. In its record-keeping final rule, the federal government admits, “Behavioral economics tells us that making injury information publicly available will ‘nudge’ employers to focus on safety.”  Dr. David Michaels, the head of OSHA, said that dirty laundry, heretofore private, will be available to investors, job seekers, customers and the public. According to the government, OSHA logs will be the basis for “big data,” which is a cruel joke given the underfunding of this agency.

The new rules also prohibit retaliation against employees. There is no private right of action for employees so they must rely upon ADOSH and the Industrial Commission of Arizona to prosecute their claims. You still must be careful not to retaliate.

ADOSH will be adopting these new rules. They will be phased in over the next two years by the number of employees and the riskiness of industries.

Here’s what you need to do now:

  • Talk with your worker compensation carrier
  • Transition from paper to electronic media
  • Ascertain what records your business must keep
  • Ascertain what is recordable
  • Review your anti-retaliation policies
  • Do not discourage reporting

Part of being an employer in the Modern World is record-keeping. Your employee handbook probably says, “Safety First.”  Now, it is imperative.

New DOL Rule Requires Employers to Act

By Bobbie Fox
Associate General Counsel
CopperPoint Insurance Companies

No doubt you have heard about the Department of Labor’s Final Rule effective Dec. 1, 2016 raising the compensation required to qualify for a “white collar” exemption (executive, administrative, and professional) from $23,660 per year to $47,476 per year. What does that mean? It means that if you have an employee that you consider to be exempt from overtime under a white collar exemption, and he or she makes less than $47,476 per year, you need to act in order to keep the exempt status. Continue reading

Workforce Development to Play Integral Role in the Future of Arizona Construction

Bo CalbertBy Bo Calbert 
President
McCarthy Building Companies
Southwest Division

Nationally, 86 percent of construction firms reported having a difficult time finding qualified workers to fill vacant positions, according to a recent Association of General Contractors (AGC) survey. This survey follows an AGC report earlier this year that predicts a shortage of 2.5 million construction workers. The lack of workers is having a negative impact on the industry and impeding the economic recovery, particularly in Arizona.

“This problem is even more staggering in states like Arizona where construction is a major economic engine and fuels numerous other industries,” said Justin Kelton, executive vice Continue reading